Restroom Requirements for Commercial Buildings

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Whether you’re the proud manager of a commercial facility, or you’re in the process of designing your building, there are a lot of legal requirements that you need to adhere to for the benefit of the facility’s occupants. More importantly, your facility’s restrooms need to meet certain standards involving architectural planning and health code standards. Here are a few tips to help you meet these OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) specific requirements for commercial buildings that ensure your occupants can have a safe and sanitary restroom.

Planning Your Toilet Facilities

When you’re planning your facility’s restrooms, there’s a lot that you need to factor into the designs. It’s always best to have an idea of how many employees or occupants are going to be in the facility on a daily basis. Generally, 1-15 occupants legally require at least one toilet per each gender-designated restroom. If the occupancy is between 36 and 55 individuals, then that number jumps to three toilets per restroom.

While many people enjoy the single occupant restroom, it can cause frustration and complaints, so if you’re planning your facility from the ground up, a multiple occupant restroom should be heavily considered. If you expect a possible influx of occupants due to company growth, choosing a multi-toilet and urinal restroom is a wise choice. Make sure to include a designated handicapped stall to be ADA compliant.

Ensuring Occupant Privacy

Relieving oneself is a private matter, so taking the necessary steps to ensure privacy is important. Single-toilet restrooms should have a door that can be locked from the inside. Multiple-toilet restrooms should feature stalls and partitions that provide the necessary privacy. Non-ADA stalls should be at least 60 inches in width and a minimum of 55 inches high, but not limited to 72 inches in height.

Sanitation Standards

Hand washing stations are also a requirement in your restroom. Signs indicating the requirement to wash hands can be helpful in reducing health risks of spreading germs and infections. For a multi-toilet restroom, more than one hand washing station should be made available to the occupants. Soap dispensers should be checked sporadically throughout the day and refilled if necessary.

A thorough cleaning should be conducted daily to ensure that any germs or bacteria are eradicated. It’s imperative to combat mold growth because it can reduce the air quality and result in respiratory issues for the occupants. Due to the constant exposure to moisture and humidity, various restroom components can actually harbor mold growth.

Whether mold has already sprouted inside your stalls, partitions, or vanities, or you’re simply looking for preventative measures, there have been great results with the implementation of HDPE (high-density polyethylene) solid plastic materials. Not only are HDPE materials impervious to mold growth, they’re also impact-, dent-, and graffiti-resistant. Due to their solid construction and homogenous coloring, they don’t require repainting. These low-maintenance stalls can actually help you keep your air quality in good standing while providing the utmost privacy and security for your occupants while they’re using the restroom.

 

Following these guidelines will help ensure that your restroom is OSHA and ADA compliant. If you’d like to learn more about designing your restroom, or the best materials to use, download the Restroom Design for Commercial Facilities or Choosing Bathroom Materials eBooks, courtesy of Scranton Products.

Bathroom Stall Installation: How to Install Commercial Bathroom Stall Doors

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Whether you’re updating your facility’s bathroom, or you’re setting up the bathrooms in a new building, there are many steps to take to make sure you’re properly installing the bathroom stall doors. You’ll want secure and stable materials that can endure the process, but also last for a long time so you don’t need to worry about continual maintenance.

Choosing the Right Materials

The beginning steps of the installation process begin with the materials you choose. Many bathroom stalls are made of solid plastic (HDPE), baked enamel, stainless steel, phenolic plywood, or solid color reinforced composite. While there are many options in materials it is important to understand which material will perform the best in a restroom environment.

In commercial restrooms, humidity and moisture are unavoidable and are always-present factors that can have a negative effect on these different materials. Stainless steel and baked enamel can begin to rust after being surrounded by moisture for a long time.  Due to the composition of Phenolic it is susceptible to mold and mildew growth.  When mold grows, it can result in foul odors that can be difficult to get rid of. When mold is present inside these stalls, you’ll need to find a suitable replacement. You can avoid the foul odors, mold growth, and drop in air quality by choosing a material like HDPE (high-density polyethylene).  This high performance solid plastic features a durable construction that’s resistant to scratches, dents, graffiti, and moisture, providing a long lasting partition for your facility’s restroom.

Planning, Design, and Installation

It’s important to follow guidelines when it comes to planning your facility’s restroom. You should adhere to ADA guidelines to ensure your restroom and its partitions are easily accessible. The restrooms should also be well lit with protective fixtures that are easy to supervise and are fitted with vandal-proof covers.

When it comes to the actual stalls and partitions, there are a few things to consider with installation. There are three different layouts to choose from for your facility; floor mounted overhead braced, ceiling hung and floor to ceiling. Floor mounted overhead braced provided the most economical solution for high traffic areas where durability is top priority. Easy installation in new construction or existing buildings makes this a versatile style option. Each factory drawing is unique depending on manufacturer so it’s important to make sure you understand the drawings and abbreviations used.

Once you understand the dimensions and drawings in a typical restroom design with pilasters and doors you most likely will begin your installation with installing side and back wall brackets. The next step you will take is to attach your pilasters to the floor. The last step is to install your hinges and doors.

If you follow the correct design plans and guidelines, restroom partition and stall door installation in your facility should be relatively easy, and using the right materials will ensure that the partitions will be long-lasting and beneficial for both you and your facility’s occupants.

How to Design a Handicap-Accessible Bathrooms

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Providing bathroom accommodations for the disabled isn’t just important if you own a public building, it’s required by law. But just how do you design accessible bathrooms for the disabled? What are the rules and regulations that architects need to know before having a contractor begin work?

In this post, we’ll take a closer look at designing accessible bathrooms for your commercial facility and what important questions you should keep in mind.

Is the Sink or Vanity Easily Accessible?

Guests should be able to wash their hands easily after using the restroom to promote a clean environment and reduce the spread of dangerous bacteria. However, certain sink or vanity constructions may make it more difficult for someone with a disability to complete this simple task.

To make your bathroom more accessible, consider mounting sinks to the wall, no more than 34 inches high and with at least 27 inches of clearance underneath. That way a guest in a wheelchair can easily approach from the front to wash their hands.

bathroom material

How Accessible Is the Toilet?

If you’re in charge of a commercial restroom, at least one toilet must be wheelchair accessible. The American Disabilities Act suggests the toilet be around 17 to 19 inches high, which makes it easy for all users to sit down, stand up, or transfer from a wheelchair.

You’ll also need to install a grab bar mounted on the closest wall. The preferred placement is two grab bars positioned 36 inches apart with the toilet placed 18 inches from either bar. This makes it easy for anyone to use the bathroom no matter what additional support they may need.

Adequate Lighting Is Important for Bathroom Accessibility

Making sure that your commercial restroom is well lit is one way to ensure accessibility. Lighting should be abundant in all areas, including inside each bathroom stall. Try to plan bathroom lighting ahead of time to avoid shadows, which might conceal hidden obstacles or create the illusion of a supportive surface where no support is available.

It’s also recommended to use motion-activated lights, so they’ll turn on automatically even when users have trouble reaching the light switch. This nifty piece of technology can also help to save your organization money since motion-activated lights turn off automatically when the facility isn’t in use.

Other Design Features for a Handicap-Accessible Bathroom

Although proper lighting and support bars are important, they’re not the only things you’ll need to consider when designing your next bathroom. For example, stall doors that open out instead of in allow for more room inside the stall itself. You should also consider hook placement on the back of stall doors so they’re accessible by those who may be disabled.

In general, doorways will need to be at least 34 inches wide for a wheelchair to pass through, but wider or labyrinth entrances might also be considered.

To learn more about restroom design for commercial facilities, download our free eBook Restroom Design for Commercial Facilities. With helpful information on choosing partitions, sustainability concerns, and more, this free guide is essential for anyone thinking about designing or redesigning a commercial bathroom.

How to Design an Eco-Friendly Bathroom

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We live in a world where environmental consciousness has become the new status quo for everything from designing candy wrappers to spaceships. But architects are left to wonder, how do you build a facility with premium features without negatively impacting the local environment?

The answer to that could easily fill a book (and it has!), so for this post, we’ll narrow it down and focus on how to design and eco-friendly bathroom.

Conserve Energy with Motion-Detectable Lighting

One of the best ways to make your bathroom more eco-friendly is to reduce the amount of wasted energy. Installing lights that rely on a motion sensor to turn on will help to keep them from running when the room is unoccupied. Just make sure to set the auto-off timer to an appropriate interval to give guests enough time to use and exit the facility before the lights shut off.

Use Automatic Faucets to Reduce Water Waste

When it comes to water waste, hand washing is one of the top perpetrators. By using an automatic faucet, you can be sure that the water is running only when someone is washing their hands.

For additional water conservation, opt for using slow-flow faucets, which use significantly less water while still offering the same amount of hand washing capability.

You can also add automatic soap dispensers, which might not save on energy costs, but they can help to make your bathroom more sanitary.

restroom cleaning checklist

Opt for an Air Hand Dryer Instead of Paper Towels

Paper towels add to the amount of waste your facility produces. Not only that, but they also contribute to the deforestation of woodland areas around the world. So instead of using paper towels in your facility, you can have an air hand dryer installed. These high-powered air dryers work just as well as paper towels without the wasteful by-product.

As a bonus, use an automatic hand dryer that will help to prevent the spread of germs and bacteria within the facility.

Install High-Efficiency Toilets

High-efficiency or low-flush toilets have been around for years, but many people have the misconception that low flush somehow equates to low quality. Nothing could be further from the truth. These highly efficient toilets use a fraction of the water of full-flush toilets but are equally as effective.

Consider installing low-flush toilets and urinals in your bathroom to make it eco-friendly.

Use Eco-Friendly Materials

When you sit down to design the bathroom, it’s important to consider what materials you’ll use. Will they need to be made from scratch or are there eco-friendly options made from recycled resources? Materials like high-density polyethylene (HDPE) offer the greatest opportunity for eco-friendly material sourcing.

HDPE is made up of recycled materials and is itself 100% recyclable. The durable plastic can be used for manufacturing bathroom vanities and toilet partitions as well as shower stalls, lockers, and other applications.

Want to learn about other ways to make your building eco-friendly? Download our FREE eBook Sustainable Building Products: How to Make Your Facility Eco-Friendly from Top to Bottom. This helpful guide will walk you through where you can implement recyclable materials, how to combat harmful emissions, and more. 

How to Choose the Right Bathroom Vanity

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Unfortunately, vanity shopping has nothing to do with buying new expensive clothes for yourself. Instead, it refers to bathroom vanities, and choosing the right one can be just as difficult as choosing the right shirt for a party. You want something that’s stylish, will go along with your restroom design, and will leave a lasting impression on your guests. But you also need it to hold up to heavy use and general wear and tear.

Understanding How Much Vanity You Need

It’s likely that the size of your facility will dictate how large your bathroom vanity can be. Smaller bathrooms, for instance, may only have space for a small vanity with a single sink. However, larger bathrooms, like commercial bathrooms, may be able to accommodate much longer vanities that have two or more sinks built in.

If your bathroom has only one toilet, then a vanity with a single sink and mirror is probably more than enough. But if there are two or more toilets (or a toilet and a urinal), you might consider choosing a longer vanity if the bathroom has room for it.

bathroom material

Storage Space Under the Vanity

Will cleaning products and toilet tissue refills be stored in the bathroom or in another location like a storage closet? If you plan on keeping them in the bathroom, you’ll need adequate storage space so they’re out of sight until your cleaning staff needs them. Most vanities can be built with drawers and cabinets, giving you ample space for storing supplies.

However, it’s important to keep in mind that while storage space is nice, it’s not always a convenient addition for your guests. This is especially true for the disabled, who may need space below the bathroom vanity to move in if they’re restricted to a wheelchair. Consult with your architect about ADA requirements and how to make sure that your bathroom provides accommodations for disabled individuals.

Choose Bathroom Vanity Material Wisely

The material your bathroom vanity is made from is just as important as the color, texture, or design. For example, a metal vanity wouldn’t be a good idea for a vanity that also features a sink or any plumbing. That’s because metal is highly susceptible to rusting when it comes in contact with moisture.

Although it can offer a distinctive look, wood isn’t necessarily a good choice for your bathroom vanity either. Wood is extremely porous and can easily absorb water should there ever be a leak. Once the wooden vanity absorbs water, it’s likely to begin rotting and could even start to grow mold, which is dangerous for both your staff and your guests.

One type of material that seems to be perfectly suited for bathroom vanities is high-density polyethylene (HDPE). Durable plastic vanities come in a wide variety of colors and textures and are naturally resistant to rust, mold, mildew, and even graffiti.

For more information about HDPE and bathroom design, check out our free eBook Restroom Design for Commercial Facilities.This helpful guide features tons of information on basic restroom requirements, sustainability, material options, and more.

Will the Gender-Neutral Bathroom Bill Affect Commercial Restroom Design?

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With the conversation about LGBTQ rights elevating in volume across the globe, one proposed piece of legislation has building managers particularly concerned: the gender-neutral bathroom bill.

However, they’re not necessarily worried about who’s using which bathroom, but rather what the bill will mean for commercial restroom design and how it could impact the facility’s budget.

What’s the Gender-Neutral Bathroom Bill?

So far, no such gender-neutral bathroom bill has been passed into law in the US, but some businesses have taken it upon themselves to update their restroom policies. Global retailer Target, for example, announced that transgender employees and customers were free to use any bathroom they wanted depending on the gender they identify with. However, following public protests and media controversy, the Minnesota-based company is now dedicating $20 million to ensure gender-neutral bathrooms in all 1,800 stores.

Several gender-neutral bathroom bills have been designed in states such as New York and California, but all have fallen apart. Many of the proposed bills had a similar policy. They called for all single-occupant bathrooms should be labeled as gender neutral.

Meanwhile, other bills requiring people to use bathrooms that matched the gender to which they were assigned at birth have also fallen through, except for the controversial Public Facilities Privacy & Security Act that passed in North Carolina earlier this year. This bill prevents transgender people who haven’t undergone sex reassignment surgery and updated their birth certificate from using the restroom that matches their gender identity.

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What Building Managers and Designers Need to Know

Should a gender-neutral bathroom bill for single-occupant bathrooms be passed into law, many building managers might find it easier to be compliant than they originally may have thought. For example, in a facility that only has single-occupant restrooms, all that may be needed is to remove the gender signs from the entrance and replace them with a gender-neutral sign or possibly no sign at all. In fact, there are many single-occupant bathrooms across the country that are already compliant in this way.

However, buildings that have multiple-occupant bathrooms may face a different challenge if these types of facilities are included in the bill. As was the case when Target announced its LGBTQ-friendly bathroom policy, public unrest could cause businesses to install new, gender-neutral bathrooms.

What Would It Mean for Commercial Restroom Design?

Since no gender-neutral bathroom bill has been successfully passed into law, it’s difficult to calculate exactly how it would affect commercial restroom design. However, there are many ways that designers and building architects may decide to handle the challenge, depending on what the legislation mandates.

For example, designers might factor a third, gender-neutral bathroom into their building designs. Another possible alternative, although probably less likely, is the completely coed bathroom, which features private, lockable stalls for all occupants.

It’s still unclear what, if any, impact a gender-neutral bathroom bill would have on commercial restroom design. However, current events have proven that the gender-neutral bathroom is something worth considering as architects and designers plan for new facilities.

How to Stop Vandalism and Graffiti in School Bathrooms

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Removing graffiti and repairing vandalism can cost your school a lot of money and how to stop vandalism is not as easy as it seems.

Not only that, but it can also give people the impression that your school is unsafe or not well maintained. To promote a positive learning environment and reduce expenses, many administrators are looking for new ways to prevent graffiti and other forms of vandalism from happening in the first place

Because vandalism is typically carried out in solitude, bathrooms are frequently targeted. For that reason, this post will concentrate on how to stop vandalism and graffiti in school bathrooms.

Act Quickly to Remove Signs of Vandalism & Graffiti

One thing that tends to promote graffiti is the existence of other vandalism. That’s why it’s important to have your custodial staff remove graffiti as soon as it’s spotted. Even waiting until the next day could inspire other acts of vandalism and lower the perceived quality and safety of your institution. Keep in mind that complete graffiti prevention is virtually impossible, but you can keep the instance of vandalism down by acting quickly.

commercial restroom cleaning

The same is also true for repairs. A bathroom with malfunctioning toilets, broken mirrors, or other issues isn’t only inconvenient, it can impact the way others treat the space. A well-maintained bathroom will likely encourage occupants to treat it with respect. A school bathroom that’s in poor condition, on the other hand, could suffer from further misuse.

Consider Using a Labyrinth Entrance

A labyrinth entrance is a design tactic that uses a turning hallway instead of a door to provide privacy into the bathroom. This type of entrance can help to reduce the occurrence of vandalism in two ways. First, it makes the distinct sounds of vandalism more noticeable by those outside the bathroom. This helps to remove a level of secrecy that most vandals hide behind.

The second way that a labyrinth entrance can help to prevent graffiti and vandalism is that there’s no door to sound an alert to vandals that security personnel is coming. Since the vandals can’t tell if someone is about to walk in and catch them in the act, they’re less likely to attempt to vandalize the bathroom.

Removing the doors on bathrooms and using a labyrinth entrance instead is also one way to keep bathrooms germ-free.

Use Graffiti-Resistant Materials

One of the most effective ways to prevent graffiti in your school bathrooms is to use graffiti-resistant materials like HDPE. HDPE, or high-density polyethylene, is a plastic material that’s resistant to graffiti, scratches, corrosion, and even germs. This durable material can be used in a variety of applications in the bathroom, including the stalls and vanities. As an added precaution, HDPE can be manufactured in a variety of colors with rough textures to create an undesirable surface for would be vandals to leave graffiti on.

You should avoid using materials like smooth steel and wood, which are easily damaged and defaced.

Above all, if you want to stop vandalism and graffiti in the bathrooms at your school, start by concentrating on keeping your facility clean and in good working condition. If you’d like to learn more about graffiti-resistant HDPE, contact Scranton Products today.

Commercial Bathroom Design & Trends

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Commercial bathrooms have come a long way from being merely utilitarian to now incorporating commercial bathroom design and trends that have a sense of style and pride within a facility. It makes a difference for occupants when the restroom is of a higher quality when it comes to appearance and design.

So, what are the latest commercial bathroom trends? They are top-notch materials and a relaxing, almost therapeutic design aesthetic. All in all, people are looking for upscale public restrooms with high-end materials, commercial bathrooms that feel more like home, and design influences that match the environment around them in a way that’s comforting and relaxing. There are new and exciting commercial bathroom designs that architects are using to stay with the forward trends.

Let’s take a closer look at these trends and see what we can learn about improving our bathroom designs for a much more pleasant and stylistic appearance, as well as a comfortable experience for future occupants.

commercial bathroom design

 

Added Sophistication

People rarely think of luxury and sophistication when talking about public bathrooms, but now that’s exactly what people want. High-end materials like granite and stainless steel are making their way from the kitchen to the restroom, providing a high-quality experience for occupants. Incorporating these materials, or materials that look like granite or stainless steel, into your commercial bathroom help to elevate the design quality of these commercial bathrooms.

While choosing stylish materials can add a much-needed sophistication to the commercial restroom, you may want to rethink your strategy so you can make your public restroom sustainable and clean. Wooden and stainless steel partitions do add to the bathroom’s stylistic appeal, but they’re also susceptible to unwanted mold growth due to the high volume of moisture and humidity in the bathroom. Mold can eventually work its way into the interior of these materials, causing foul odors and a major decline in air quality.

Utilizing durable materials like HDPE (high-density polyethylene) to replace traditional materials has numerous benefits. HDPE is resistant to humidity and moisture due to its solid plastic construction, and unsightly mold won’t grow, resulting in foul smells and less-than-stellar air quality. Architects and designers realize that using this material has many benefits in both appearance and function. Plus, bathroom partitions like Eclipse Partitions from Scranton Products feature no-sight hardware, eliminate sight lines, and have various privacy options.

 

Check out our traditional, warm tone, metallic and bold colors combined with our contour or rotary brushed textures to add some luxury and sophistication to your next bathroom project.

 

There’s No Place Like Home

When it comes to bathrooms, there’s nothing like having your own private space. So it’s no surprise that one of the hottest commercial bathroom design trends happening now is creating a spa-like bathroom with premium materials. Designers are also replacing the bright, florescent lighting, often the hallmark of public bathrooms, with softer incandescent down lighting to make it easier on the eyes and to provide a more comfortable and welcoming environment without the harsh lights becoming bothersome to occupants.

While privacy is one of the most important factors when designing a bathroom, function is equally as important when designing your commercial bathroom or public restroom. Architects and bathroom designers are utilizing more durable materials like HDPE when creating the stalls and partitions. HDPE materials that are being used have the benefits of being scratch- and graffiti-resistant. Due to these choices, replacements aren’t as frequent because the HDPE material can last for a long time.

Designers know to use these durable partitions for the benefit of having a long-lasting partition without needing to conduct any repairs. However, they also understand that the occupant’s privacy is another major factor to consider with their design plans. Architects and designers are starting to incorporate privacy features like taller doors and privacy hinges. The privacy hinges serve a functional purpose, but due to their hidden placement, the stalls and partitions deliver a clear and solid look without unsightly metal hinges and parts from interfering with the stylistic appeal.

 

View our new Eclipse Partitions to add privacy and aesthetics to your next restroom project.

 

Keep a Common Theme

Designers are taking elements from the rest of a building’s interior design or the surrounding environment and bringing it into the restroom for a more coherent and seamless look. This goes way beyond the simple themed bathroom that pays homage to an era, a famous person, or a pop culture icon. Examples include the public restroom at Bryant Park in New York. This bathroom mimics the design of the nearby New York Public Library. Bryant Park’s public restrooms were so well received that they were voted number one by Virtual Tourist.

Meanwhile, the restrooms at Santa Monica Pier in California feature an undulating roof evoking thoughts of a vintage rollercoaster or the nearby ocean waves. This stylistic and thematic approach to bathroom design has garnished a great deal of attention and praise. The bathroom at The Muse Hotel in New York allows visitors to choose if they’re feeling envious, passionate, glamorous, rebellious, macho, or vain. This kind of fun approach has made the bathrooms in the Muse Hotel some of the more popular public restroom facilities in the New York City area.

What all these bathrooms have in common is a uniqueness that’s personal, original, and aesthetically pleasing. To add uniqueness to your next project, consider adding custom embossing like a school mascot, company logo, or other personalized details that not only add to the restroom’s aesthetics, but make the restrooms seem more a part of the whole building. This type of consistency adds a more pleasing appearance and a comfortable atmosphere for the occupants.

For more inspiration, check out our eBook for public bathroom design, Restroom Design for Commercial Facilities. Take notes and improve upon the designs to find your perfect commercial restroom.

9 Things to Consider Before Designing Your Commercial Bathroom

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Commercial bathroom design involves a lot of moving parts, all of which need to be considered before implementation if your design is going to be worth building. The most important factors to consider before designing your commercial bathroom include the number of users, durability, water savings, and serviceability. You also need to consider initial and operational costs, Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) standards, materials, and building codes.

Though it might seem like a lot of balls to juggle, making sure to discuss these nine components will help you ensure that your commercial bathroom design is a winner.

1.    Number of Occupants

The number of people you expect to be using your commercial bathroom will greatly alter its final design. For example, a bathroom at a major sports complex will need to accommodate more occupants to avoid excessive queuing than a commercial bathroom located at a small family doctor’s office.

Understanding the expected amount of demand or use will help you to determine how large to make the restroom, how many commercial bathroom stalls or urinals to include, how many sinks or hand drying fixtures you’ll need, and so on.

commercial bathroom design

2.    Durability

There’s no doubt that building owners want the commercial bathrooms to be durable, but what level of durability is being required? For instance, a wooden bathroom vanity provides some durability. However, wood is highly susceptible to water damage from leaky pipes, scratches, graffiti, and other damage.

Meanwhile, materials such as high-density polyethylene (HDPE) provide exceptional durability. HDPE is resistant to dents, unlike metal, as well as scratches, mildew, graffiti, and more. HDPE also reduces environmental impact and offers improvements to the indoor air quality of the bathroom.

3.    Water Savings

The choice of water-using fixtures is an important one because it will determine both initial and long-term costs for the facility. For example, the average toilet uses 1.6 gallons of water each time it’s flushed. A high-efficiency toilet, on the other hand, uses 1.28 gallons. If a toilet is flushed 10 times each day, the average unit would use 5,840 gallons a year while the high-efficiency unit only used 4,672.

A bathroom with three high-efficiency toilets could save roughly 3,504 gallons of water per year compared to a commercial bathroom with three standard toilets.

4.    Serviceability

Should damage or a major plumbing problem arise, you’ll want to make sure that your restroom is easily serviced. That way a qualified repair team can quickly fix the problem and get your bathroom up and running again. This may be achieved by adding a service panel on the other side of the wall where workers can reach pipes or wiring.

5.    Initial Costs

Understanding the initial costs of your project will help you to better determine how to design it. How much will it cost to purchase materials? Provide installation? Inspection fees? These initial costs will ultimately help to define the budget for your project, which could dictate your final design. For example, it may be more cost-effective to add more urinals and fewer toilets in the men’s room.

6.    Operational Costs

After you take into account the initial costs of building the bathroom, you should consider the long-term operational costs. This can include the cost to provide lighting and electricity, water, and the cost for maintenance and repairs. One way to keep operational costs down is to use high-quality, durable materials for fixtures and vanities.

7.    Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility

For your design to meet ADA guidelines, you need to have them in mind when developing your commercial bathroom. This can include many parts of the restroom, including the entrance. For example, a labyrinth-style entrance should have enough room for a wheelchair to pass through with room to spare on either side.

8.    Economic Quality of Fixtures Used

Will your design use the good, better, or best materials available? Good materials are often low in price but may require frequent maintenance or provide a low level of durability. The best materials, on the other hand, typically provide a higher initial cost but require less attention in terms of maintenance and repairs. HDPE, for instance, is extremely durable and long lasting, making it a popular material for commercial restroom projects.

9.    Local Codes

Before you start designing a commercial bathroom, you want to know what the local codes and regulations are. This will significantly impact what you can and can’t do in terms of design. Failure to consider the local building and occupancy codes could result in denied building applications and potential legal issues in the future.

Learn more about the many HDPE products available for your commercial bathroom design.

Why You Need to Care about ASTM Standards

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When you’re purchasing products for your facility, you want to make sure they’re long-lasting and high-quality. You also want to make sure they’re safe for use and they perform the way they’re supposed to. The products in your facility are investments and it’s crucial that they are the deliverables you’re in need of. ASTM (The American Society for Testing and Materials) will help you determine whether your products adhere to these standards.

What are ASTM Standards?

ASTM is recognized globally as a leader in development and delivery of voluntary consensus standards. Over 12,000 ASTM standards are used all over the world to improve product quality, enhance health and safety, strengthen market access and trade, and to let customers know they can count on products. ASTM serves many industries, such as metals, construction, petroleum, consumer products and more. Standards have been developed in accordance with the guiding principles of the World Trade Organization. These standards are used by individuals, companies and institutions globally. Government regulators cite standards in laws, regulations and codes.

How is an ASTM standard developed?

A member of an ASTM technical committee will identify a need to develop a standard. Group members will prepare a draft standard and it is then reviewed by its parent subcommittee.

Why is this important?

When individuals, companies, or institutions have products that adhere to ASTM standards, their products are proven to be reliable. Many tests are performed to find out vital information about the products and what they have to offer consumers. Consumers can rest assured knowing that the products they are purchasing will be effective and perform the way they expect it to. They also know that the standards make these products safe for use so that they’re not in danger. These standards also allow suppliers to know that their products are top notch and they’re offering the best quality to their customers.

Do Scranton Products adhere to ASTM standards?

Scranton Products are sustainable, durable and microbial resistance. HDPE plastic exhibited no microbial growth during a 21-day testing period which was conducted in accordance with ASTM D3293. While HDPE was microbial free, Phenolic had mold and mildew growth. The durability of Scranton Products also adheres to ASTM standards. The abrasion resistance of various bathroom partition materials was measured in accordance with ASTM G195, which resulted in HDPE having the best abrasion resistance with the lowest surface wear. Based on graffiti resistance, Scranton Products adheres to ASTM standards. Testing was conducted in accordance with ASTM D6578 which provides a standard set of conditions that can be used to evaluate the graffiti resistance of a surface. Seven marking agents and six cleaning products were used in the evaluation to show that HDPE is graffiti resistant utilizing no specialized maintenance procedure or additional coating. ASTM standards go a long way in proving how valuable a product is.

Click here to find out where you can buy Scranton Products.


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