Why HDPE Is a Superior Material

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HDPE (high-density polyethylene) is a durable solid plastic that has a variety of applications. Most notably, HDPE is used for partitions, stalls, and lockers for commercial and educational facilities. Many businesses and schools have implemented HDPE materials with amazing results. So, why is HDPE being considered a super material for facilities?

Durability

As a facility manager, when it comes time for remodeling and renovations, you need to think ahead. Choosing a highly durable material has its advantages because you want the material lasting throughout the years without having to pay a fortune for replacements. HDPE has proven to be a stronger, more stable material than most plastics, wood, and even metal. It’s impact-resistant, so it can stand up to the pressures and elements of your facility.

When you choose HDPE, you no longer have to worry about any exterior damages. HDPE won’t scratch or dent, so you don’t have to have replacements on-hand. You don’t even have to worry about graffiti, because with HDPE, it can be easily wiped away.

Improving Air Quality

One of the main reasons why HDPE materials are utilized as restroom stalls is because it not only provides security and privacy, but it can also help keep the air quality high. Restrooms are a hotbed of moisture and humidity. Most plastic partitions have a kraft paper or cardboard core that can become moist, and eventually will sprout mold. Mold will not only lower the air quality, but it’ll result in a pungent odor that won’t be corrected with air fresheners.

When standard plastic partitions have mold sprouting inside of them, it’s too late, and they’ll have to be replaced in order to get rid of the mold. HDPE, on the other hand, resists mold growth because of its solid plastic construction. Because mold can’t grow in HDPE partitions, your air quality won’t drop, and you won’t have to replace your partitions anytime soon.

Low Maintenance

One phrase that facility managers love to hear is “low maintenance.” HDPE plastic doesn’t require a lot of upkeep. Because it’s a highly durable material, it doesn’t get the normal wear and tear that most materials get. In fact, it can outlast most plastics and won’t rust like metal. It doesn’t even require any fresh coats of paint because of its homogenous coloring. All that HDPE requires is a light cleaning every now and again.

Sustainability

Another major benefit to HDPE is that it’s made from 100% post-consumer recycled material. They’re even recyclable themselves. You can effectively take your facility in a greener, more eco-friendly direction by installing HDPE lockers and partitions. Because it doesn’t require new coats of paint, you greatly reduce the risk of VOC (volatile organic compound) emissions in the air, which can reduce the quality and have a negative effect on occupant health.

 

Are you interested in learning more about why HDPE is a superior material? Download this FREE eBook, The Ultimate Guide to HDPE Plastic Lockers, or contact us at Scranton Products.

Graffiti Resistant Material: Stop School Vandalism in Its Tracks

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It’s always important for a school to have an arts program. However, said arts should be designated on paper or canvas, not on the walls, stalls, or lockers. Graffiti and vandalism are a constant scourge in educational facilities all across the country, and keeping up with it can be a stressful and costly endeavor. The key is to find a graffiti resistant material to combat vandalism and graffiti in a way that’s cost efficient and beneficial to your school facility.

The Problem with Graffiti in Schools

While public art can have numerous benefits, such as a showcase of talent, or even a conversation starter, its best reserved outdoors and permitted by building owners and managers. In schools, graffiti can not only be destructive to property, but also to a member of the school like a student or teacher. As a facility manager, it’s your responsibility to take care of the mess, and it’s your job to prevent it

The most common way to cover up the graffiti is by painting over it. But while this seems like a simple fix, there are a few factors that may make you want to rethink your graffiti-removal strategy. The paint may not match the surface that the graffiti is on, so this little cosmetic imperfection can reduce the aesthetic value of your facility. Another byproduct of covering up the graffiti with paint is the VOC (volatile organic compound) emissions that’ll reduce your air quality and possibly lead to health issues with the students or faculty.

A Cost-Effective & Sustainable Way of Battling Graffiti

One of the best ways to combating vandalism and graffiti is by utilizing durable materials that can actually resist the paint or marker that’s being used. HDPE (high-density polyethylene) is a solid plastic that can stand up to graffiti. Due to its homogenous coloring, it doesn’t absorb the paint, and any graffiti can simply be wiped away without having to paint over it.

HDPE can be utilized as both lockers and bathroom partitions, the most common locations for unwanted graffiti to pop up. Bathroom partitions are far more commonplace for graffiti due to its concealment. But using HDPE materials in these locations has numerous benefits, the obvious being its impressive stance against graffiti.

Due to the solid construction, HDPE won’t endure any damage to its exterior. It’s impact resistant, and it won’t crack due to excessive hits. The material won’t even become infested with mold and mildew because it can stand up to the humidity and moisture that’s common in restrooms.

Making the Jump to HDPE

While replacing your traditional lockers and bathroom partitions can seem like a massive undertaking, so can keeping up with the removal of repetitive graffiti. HDPE lockers and partitions require very little maintenance, saving you a lot of time and money. And when graffiti does appear, simply wipe it away.

 

Want to learn more about using HDPE in your school? Download The Ultimate Guide to HDPE Plastic Lockersor Safe School Design: How Architecture Plays a Role in Creating Safe & Secure Educational Spaces today, courtesy of Scranton Products.

Important Facility Management Goals and Objectives for Facilities of All Types

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Managing a facility isn’t the easiest job in the world because there are many responsibilities involved. Whether your facility is a school, gym, or office building, it’s important to take note of issues and objectives so all your occupants are happy. Here are a few important facility management goals and objectives that are suitable for all types of facilities.

Communication with Stakeholders and Occupants

To set facility management goals, it’s crucial to keep an open line of dialogue with stakeholders and occupants to ensure that everything is running as smoothly as possible. Open communication allows you to learn how the facility is perceived daily, along with some recommendations to make the facility a more comfortable environment. Design a system where occupants can easily send in their opinions and recommendations so you can ensure that all occupants are comfortable and happy with their surroundings.

Provide a Safe and Healthy Environment

It’s important to include potential health risks in your facility management goals to contain and correct these risks in your facility. Bathrooms are good areas to keep up with for cleanliness. It’s a room that’s visited by all, so make it as pleasant as possible by keeping it stocked with plenty of toiletries and air fresheners.

Because moisture is a common occurrence in bathrooms, be aware of any mold growth. Inspect the stalls to make sure they’re free of mold. However, depending on the material, it may already be too late. Invest in some high-density polyethylene (HDPE) stalls to not only prevent mold growth but because HDPE plastic doesn’t require any repainting or touch-ups, no harmful VOC emissions reduce the quality of your air. HDPE materials are even resistant to scratches, dents, and graffiti. They’re also more durable than most plastics, so they’ll last much longer.

Be Mindful of Deficiencies

As a facility manager, it’s important to notice any issues or deficiencies within your facility. It’s always good to perform a routine check every three to six months to make sure everything is in working order. Not only will this be effective in keeping everything running smoothly, but you’ll be able to spot any mechanical issues that could become more severe if left unchecked. Including preventative maintenance in your facility management goals is a more cost-effective alternative than a full repair or replacement.

Improve and Endorse Energy Efficiency

Taking steps to make your facility more energy efficient is important. Review the data on your facility’s gas, electricity, and water expenses to find out what’s costing the most and how you can reduce wasted energy. If you have room in the facility budget, invest in some energy-efficient light bulbs and give your building equipment a tune-up. Inspect for any leaks and seal them to prevent further energy waste.

Want to learn more about the many ways you can improve the air quality and energy efficiency of your facility? Download our eBook, Sustainable Building Products: How to Make Your Facility Eco-Friendly from Top to Bottom today.

Maintenance Tips for Commercial Restrooms

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Almost all facility managers know that their commercial restroom requires a lot of care, attention, and upkeep. But when tackling the restroom, it’s important to be sure of the necessary steps to guarantee that your bathroom is completely clean. Here are a few important steps to take for a cleaner restroom.

Cleaning Your Restroom

The restroom in your facility is one area that gets the most foot traffic. Due to the amount of visitors, general upkeep can feel like a mounting and endless endeavor. But knowing the proper methods and effective tricks can help make the process of cleaning the restroom easier. 

 

Scrubbing & Disinfecting

When cleaning your facility’s restroom, you need to make sure that you properly scrub and disinfect every surface. This includes sinks, vanities, toilets, urinals, and stalls. Check and see if all surfaces are free of soils, spots, stains, and other residue. Make sure that all surfaces are dry when you’re finished cleaning. 

 

Tackling the Floors

Focusing on the floor is important because of the germs and dirt that make their way in from occupants’ shoes. The floor should be swept and then mopped using a high-grade disinfectant. Be sure that the floor is free of dirt, mildew, and buildup. Also be sure that it’s slip resistant, so occupants can safely walk without hurting themselves. 

 

Freshening the Air

One of the first things that people will notice when they enter a commercial restroom is the room’s overall fragrance. While bathrooms are known for a variety of expected odors, it’s important to stay on top of these odors. Keep air fresheners available for occupants to use. However, if there’s mold sprouting in your bathroom, a simple air freshener may not be strong enough to handle the job.

Ridding Your Restroom of Mold

If you have mold in your bathroom, you need to locate where it’s actually growing. The most common location is actually inside your stalls and partitions. Due to the constant barrage of moisture and humidity, the inside of your stalls can become a breeding ground for mold, and once it’s present, it can be really hard to remove it.

If your stalls and partitions are indeed affected by mold, you may want to consider replacing them altogether. Using a solid plastic like HDPE (high-density polyethylene) can be one of the most effective ways to combat the threat of mold growing in your restroom and reducing the quality of your air.

HDPE is a highly durable material that can withstand mold growth. It can endure constant exposure to moisture and humidity without any risk of mold sprouting. Utilizing HDPE stalls and partitions not only reduces mold growth, but because of its resistance, it can help increase the air quality in your restroom.

 

Did you find these tips helpful? For more information to help you with your restroom, download our FREE eBooks, Choosing Bathroom Materials and Commercial Restroom Cleaning Checklist, courtesy of Scranton Products.

Bathroom Stall Installation: How to Install Commercial Bathroom Stall Doors

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Whether you’re updating your facility’s bathroom, or you’re setting up the bathrooms in a new building, there are many steps to take to make sure you’re properly installing the bathroom stall doors. You’ll want secure and stable materials that can endure the process, but also last for a long time so you don’t need to worry about continual maintenance.

Choosing the Right Materials

The beginning steps of the installation process begin with the materials you choose. Many bathroom stalls are made of solid plastic (HDPE), baked enamel, stainless steel, phenolic plywood, or solid color reinforced composite. While there are many options in materials it is important to understand which material will perform the best in a restroom environment.

In commercial restrooms, humidity and moisture are unavoidable and are always-present factors that can have a negative effect on these different materials. Stainless steel and baked enamel can begin to rust after being surrounded by moisture for a long time.  Due to the composition of Phenolic it is susceptible to mold and mildew growth.  When mold grows, it can result in foul odors that can be difficult to get rid of. When mold is present inside these stalls, you’ll need to find a suitable replacement. You can avoid the foul odors, mold growth, and drop in air quality by choosing a material like HDPE (high-density polyethylene).  This high performance solid plastic features a durable construction that’s resistant to scratches, dents, graffiti, and moisture, providing a long lasting partition for your facility’s restroom.

Planning, Design, and Installation

It’s important to follow guidelines when it comes to planning your facility’s restroom. You should adhere to ADA guidelines to ensure your restroom and its partitions are easily accessible. The restrooms should also be well lit with protective fixtures that are easy to supervise and are fitted with vandal-proof covers.

When it comes to the actual stalls and partitions, there are a few things to consider with installation. There are three different layouts to choose from for your facility; floor mounted overhead braced, ceiling hung and floor to ceiling. Floor mounted overhead braced provided the most economical solution for high traffic areas where durability is top priority. Easy installation in new construction or existing buildings makes this a versatile style option. Each factory drawing is unique depending on manufacturer so it’s important to make sure you understand the drawings and abbreviations used.

Once you understand the dimensions and drawings in a typical restroom design with pilasters and doors you most likely will begin your installation with installing side and back wall brackets. The next step you will take is to attach your pilasters to the floor. The last step is to install your hinges and doors.

If you follow the correct design plans and guidelines, restroom partition and stall door installation in your facility should be relatively easy, and using the right materials will ensure that the partitions will be long-lasting and beneficial for both you and your facility’s occupants.

Daily Facility Maintenance Checklist: Keep Your Facility in Tip-Top Shape

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Your facility is a representation of your business, so why wouldn’t you want it to speak volumes? Future employees, visitors, and clients will walk through the doors and immediately take notice of issues that could sway their opinions. Staying on top of daily facility maintenance is crucial in keeping your facility in tip-top shape.

We’ve compiled this daily facility maintenance checklist to help spot any potential issues within your facility. You’ll also learn some helpful tips and tricks to make your facility’s clean and inviting appearance last longer.

  • Taking Preliminary Steps Toward a Cleaner Floor

One of the first items that should be at the top of your daily maintenance checklist is cleaning your facility’s floors. Dirty floors are an eyesore. They stick out immediately. The good news is, there are some steps you can take to help avoid tracking in dirt and waste.

Welcome mats are highly effective in reducing the amount of dirt that makes its way into your facility. It’s smart to have a welcome mat outside the entrance. You’ll also want another mat inside the foyer or lobby to help collect more dirt. Using an exterior and interior mat, you’ll help keep your floors cleaner longer, and potentially reduce maintenance costs.

  • Keeping Storage and Lockers Clean

If you have cubbies, lockers, or general storage compartments, you already know how dirty they can get. When they’re constantly being opened, dirt tends to build up, which makes those lockers and cubbies unsightly.

Whether these compartments get scuffed up or drawn on, you’ll want to ensure that you can keep them as clean as possible. The type of material you choose can play a big role in facility maintenance. For instance, high-density polyethylene (HDPE) lockers are resistant to scratches, dents, and even unwanted graffiti. Due to its high durability, HDPE never needs to be repainted, resulting in less volatile organic compound emissions that could be harmful if inhaled. It’s also one of the easiest plastics to recycle, so by installing these HDPE compartments, your facility takes a big step toward sustainability.

  • Sprucing Up the Bathroom

The next item to address on your daily maintenance facility checklist is the bathroom. It’s one of the most visited rooms in your facility, and with that much foot traffic, you’ll need to take some steps to ensure a pleasant experience for everyone. It’s always wise to keep plug-in air fresheners on hand, but how are your stalls holding up? This is another area where materials matter, especially when you consider the threat of rust often faced in commercial restrooms. Materials like steel or wood are prone to damage when they encounter moisture. However, other materials like HDPE are completely rust and mildew resistant.

  • Keeping Maintenance Cleaning Materials Stocked

Things like cleaning materials, toilet paper, and paper towels should always be on hand with plenty of backup to accommodate higher than anticipated volume. You also want to make sure your waste baskets and trash cans are easily accessible and not tucked in the corner. If they’re easy to get to, waste is more likely to make it in the trash without winding up on the floor.

By utilizing this daily facility maintenance checklist, you’re on the way to keeping your facility in tip-top shape. If you’re interested in learning more about bathroom cleaning and care, learn more in our article regarding how to care for your commercial bathroom vanities.

How to Conduct an Effective Facility Audit for Your School

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As a school facility manager, it’s important to perform routine facility and safety audits so the students, faculty, and staff can enjoy a comfortable environment while you ensure that everything is up to code. Learning how you can improve your facility or update your systems is crucial.

Here are a few helpful tips to show you the proper facility audit procedures.

Facility Audit

There are many factors at play when it comes to conducting a facility audit. The audit will require time and resources but only to ensure that everything is running as efficiently as possible. Whether you have an outsider come in to inspect or the school district has a professional at their disposal, it’s important to have an updated inventory checklist on hand so the process can be as efficient as possible. The facility audit is performed to gauge the status of your facility and determine if any updates or repairs would be necessary.

Necessary Inspections

When you’re conducting a facility audit, you should have your inventory checklist with the equipment and the date that said equipment was manufactured and installed. This will help the auditor determine the life cycle of the equipment and systems in your facility. By providing the auditor with the necessary resources, the actual audit should be fairly easy to compete.

Facility Audit

The auditor will carefully inspect your HVAC system to determine its quality and effectiveness and if it requires any repairs to pass inspection. If you’ve kept up with routine maintenance, this shouldn’t be a problem. Your water system will also be inspected to ensure the water quality and the functionality of the pumps and pipes.

The grounds of your facility will also be carefully inspected. The auditor will look for any damage to the exterior of the building as well as the quality of the parking lots. The auditor will also assess the landscaping and athletic fields to ensure student safety.

Areas to Focus On

Every facility or school has its weak spots, or areas that require a lot of focus and perhaps even maintenance. Bathrooms can be one of these areas, as several factors can contribute to a less-than-adequate audit. Air quality is an important aspect in the bathroom audit, so as a facility manager, you should take steps to ensure that everything is acceptable and up to par.

Bathrooms can be a breeding ground for mold and fungus, which have a negative effect on the air quality. Due to the overwhelming moisture and humidity, several components of your bathroom can be susceptible to mold growth. Your stalls and partitions may have mold sprouting inside them, so think about replacing these stalls with a more durable material like HDPE (high-density polyethylene), which is resistant to moisture, scratches, and even graffiti.

If you’ve kept up with your facility’s systems in terms of maintenance and repairs, you should expect good results from an audit. However, a variety of measures can help you to achieve a great audit. You may even want to consider some renovations. Learn more by downloading our eBook The Complete Guide to Renovating Your School’s Locker Room.

Why You Should Consider Maintenance Costs When Designing a New Building

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It’s easy to overlook maintenance costs when designing a new building, but it could end up hurting you. That’s because administrators, contractors, architects, and other building officials are under constant pressure to keep costs down and stay within budget. However, choosing the cheapest materials or building methods can have expensive maintenance requirements.

In this post, we take a closer look at why it’s important to consider maintenance costs when designing a new building as well as the difference between initial cost and life cycle cost.

Understanding Initial Cost and Life Cycle Cost

When you create a budget for a new building design, you’re looking at the initial cost. The budget specifies how much of the allocated funds will be used for each component, including supplies and labor. Although it’s true that every project relies on this number for approval, shooting for the lowest initial cost isn’t always the best decision.

For example, when purchasing building materials, the least expensive option might be of the poorest quality. In most circumstances, you pay more for higher quality and longer material life span.

Life cycle cost, on the other hand, is a way of budgeting that considers the entire cost of a material over the course of its life span. This includes any anticipated repairs, replacements, or maintenance. For example, let’s say one lamp cost $100 and another cost $200. The first lamp is cheaper, but the life expectancy of the second lamp is three times as long.

Thus, you’d spend more money in the long run by purchasing the $100 lamp since you’d have to replace it twice before you’d need to replace the more expensive lamp.

Calculating Maintenance Costs

Now that you’ve learned the difference between initial and life cycle costs, it’s easy to see why buying for life cycle costs is the smarter choice. But how exactly do you know if a material or building method will help to lower maintenance costs? Here are a few ways to help you make the right decision.

Is It Easy to Clean?

Clean materials tend to outlast those that aren’t, so opting for materials and products that are easy to clean and care for is a great idea. But not only might the material last long, it could also save you money on cleaning costs since less cleaning materials will need to be used.

Maintenance Costs

Does It Resist Damage?

Being durable is a good sign that the product or material is going to help cut your long-term maintenance costs. The good news is, products that are resistant to damage like dents, scratches, or graffiti will usually showcase that aspect as one of the primary features of the product. If you’re not sure, talk with your architect or contractor.

What Kind of Regular Care Does It Need?

Lights will need to have their bulbs replaced, HVAC systems will require routine maintenance, but it’s important to know these things before you make a purchase and factor that into the life cycle cost. For example, HDPE bathroom partitions are colored throughout and don’t require painting or repainting, whereas metal partitions do.

As you can see, it’s vital for you to consider maintenance costs when designing a new building. Follow these tips and you’ll be on your way to building a cost-effective facility.

How to Remove Mold in Your Shower & Locker Rooms

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Mold inside the shower or locker rooms of your facility can be a big problem. Not only does it discolor grout and weaken wood, but it’s also potentially hazardous to your health and the health of those using your facility. So to make sure that your locker rooms and showers are safe and mold-free, it’s important to remove any signs of mold or mildew once they appear.

In this guide, we’ll tell you how to remove mold properly as well as how you can prevent mold from coming back.

locker replacement checklist

What You Need for Mold Removal

Having the proper supplies is an important part of mold removal. After all, if the mold isn’t removed properly, there’s a good chance it will come back and spread to other areas of your facility. Not only that, but without the right gear, your cleaning team could get sick when trying to clean the infected areas.

Here’s what you need:

1.      Old clothes or a jumpsuit: You want to launder or dispose of any clothes you wear when cleaning the mold-infected area. Otherwise, you could unintentionally spread mold to other rooms or experience an adverse reaction to the mold spores.

2.      Rubber gloves: These are important to protect your hands from coming in contact with mold or the cleaning chemicals used during removal.

3.      N-95 or P-100 respirator: These respirators are specially made to block out mold spores, which can be as small as 3 microns. For reference, a strand of human hair is about 125 microns.

4.      Safety goggles: These will protect your eyes from any mold spores that might be floating in the air as well as any harmful vapors from the cleaning chemicals.

5.      Spray bottle: You can use a simple spray bottle filled with water to gently wet any visible mold before you start cleaning to limit the number of spores released into the air.

6.      Box fan: It’s vital to keep the room well ventilated. If there’s a window or door leading outside, use a large box fan to remove any mold spores. Be sure to cover any part of the window or door with a plastic drop cloth or cardboard so the spores can’t accidently blow back into the room. DO NOT use fans if blowing into another room in the facility – only use if there’s a direct path outside.

7.      Bleach: Use bleach and water to treat mold-infected areas.

8.      Bucket for cleaning

9.      Scrub brush

10.  Flathead screwdriver for grout lines

How to Remove Mold

After you’ve put on your protective clothing and set up any appropriate ventilation, it’s time to start treating the mold-infected areas. If you can’t ventilate the room properly, seal it off from the rest of the facility until cleaning is complete. Be sure to cover any air vents or turn off the ventilation system.

When you’re ready to start, use the spray bottle to gently wet the mold. This will help to prevent spores from flying into the air as you clean. Then use a 1:8 bleach/water mixture to clean the infected areas. Scrub using a tough cleaning brush or use a flathead screwdriver to gently scrape mold from grout lines. Consider adding some detergent to your cleaning mixture to make it easier to lift the mold.

Rinse surfaces well. Wipe down the walls, floors, and any other treated surface and launder or dispose of the used towels. Place them in a large trash bag to try to keep any of the mold from escaping.

Preventing Mold from Returning

Treating mold can be a relatively quick and inexpensive process, but it’s even easier to prevent mold and mildew from occurring in the first place. One of the best ways is to reduce the amount of moisture in the room. However, this is difficult to do in locker rooms and showers.

So the next option for preventing mold is to use materials in your facility that are naturally resistant to mold and mildew. Materials like high-density polyethylene, or HDPE, are known for their high resistance to mold. Not only that, but HDPE is also resistant to bacteria and rust.

Water Conservation Challenges & Strategies for Maintenance Managers

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One of the biggest issues plaguing commercial and institutional facilities today is water waste. Whether it’s due to old pipes, leaks, or faucets that aren’t turned off, maintenance managers are desperate for solutions that can help them to keep the water bill down and improve their building’s water efficiency.

In this post, we take a closer look at a few water conservation challenges as well as strategies for maintenance managers.

Finding Opportunities for Water Conservation

One of the initial water conservation challenges that maintenance managers face is pinpointing where to focus their efforts and where opportunities lie. The first step, of course, is to gather some benchmark data. Find out how much water your building uses every day, month, quarter, or year, whatever number makes the most sense for your project and company.

Next, you want to focus on the water use of individual fixtures. For example, how many gallons of water are used with each flush of a toilet in your building? How many gallons are those toilets using each day/month/quarter/year? Gather as much information as possible.

Consider the following areas:

  • Toilets
  • Urinals
  • Showers
  • Sprinklers
  • Irrigation systems
  • Sinks/faucets
  • Pipes and plumping

Once you can identify where your building is using the most water, you’ll be able to target those areas first for the biggest benefit. Then you can concentrate on areas that use smaller amounts of water.

[READ MORE: How to Cut Energy Costs in Your Facility]

How to Get Upper Management to Buy In

Although you might see the benefit of investing in water conservation, it’s not always easy to get the board to agree. It’s common for maintenance managers and their teams to spend months, if not years, proposing water conservation tactics before receiving final approval. So how can you help to speed up the process?

Step one is to do your homework. Make sure that you have all data on current consumption rates as we discussed in the previous section. Then clearly spell out what the initial investment will be for all necessary replacement fixtures, repairs, or updates and pair it with a total return on investment or total savings.

By having these numbers ready, you’ll be able to clearly explain to anyone that needs to give approval how much the project will cost, how long it will take before that cost is recouped, and how much the company or building will save after those costs are returned.

[READ MORE: Identifying and Resolving Energy Inefficiencies in Your Building]

Recycling Water

In areas where collecting storm water is possible, this might be an opportunity to reduce your water expense with necessarily reducing consumption. Collected rain water can be great for use in irrigation or flushing toilets. Consider using the roof of your building for collection and storing the water in tanks for later use. Though this method won’t work in every situation (especially if your building has a small roof), it’s certainly something worth looking into.

Also, be sure to check with local ordinances since, in some parts of the world, it’s illegal to catch rain water in large quantities.

For more information on how you can make your facility eco-friendlier, check out our free eBook Sustainable Building Products. This helpful resource will teach you about using recyclable materials, how to combat harmful air pollutants indoors, environmentally friendly products, and more!